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The first semblance of walls

You know how when you get so used to something that has always been one way and then when it changes, even if you've wanted it to change more than anything in the world, you worry you've done the wrong thing.  Well, that's how progress feels.   Since we first pulled down the old fireplace to investigate the wall behind, the living room wall has had exposed mud and straw wall covering on show.  This historic wall covering has been visible for two years and we always knew it would have to be covered up.  All of a sudden, now the plasterers have been there the mud and straw is gone...I miss it but I love the new walls.  

The living room has been plastered
The plasterers have rough coat plastered the library, the living room and sheet rock walls are slowly filling the house.

The passage to the library and powder room
The sense of the physical space of the house is really coming together and this week we have the insulation guys in and finally all the walls can be closed up.  It will begin to feel like a house again.  

Living room walls
Library with walls
We've finally approved the expenditure on the new geothermal units and the generator.  We have sourced the new floor boards and although they are turning out to be much more expensive than anticipated, we will hopefully have the floor boards next week.  We will be putting in the new electrical service next week and the water pump and other plumbing will be completed this week too, hopefully.  I can only hope that in a week or two we will have the heating going and some running water.  

Kitchen wall behind the cabinets
At the moment the house is so cold that the ice forms on the inside.   The contractors have a huge space heater that pumps our masses of heat and keeps the place warm.  It runs on diesel and makes the house smell of fuel but it is at least warm.  

Ice inside the window
Upstairs remains unfinished because we are waiting for the insulation.  Here's the 'before' picture.  This weekend we will post the 'after' pictures of the insulation.

Master Bedroom before the foam arrives

Comments

  1. These renovations should last a hundred years? Well bits of them. It seems worth it to have done it well, as in the long term the costs fade and the results last. S

    ReplyDelete

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